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Sprinting for long TT on bike

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  nwchick 4 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #2839

    nwchick
    Member

    Hi!

    I am in the middle of trianing for the Seattle to Portland bike ride and have been using cfe/cf. Love it but am going to do a 30 mile TT this weekend and am having trouble figuring out how to "sprint" that whole time. I can sprint for shorter distances, but when its longer i cant hold the same sprint speed the whole time. Any suggestions or tips? Do you just try and hold a little bit faster than your normal speed for that length?

    Thanks all and hope your trianing is going well!
    Sarah

    #2840

    jonyoon
    Member

    Have you done a ride at your tempo speed/feel?

    #2841

    SDerst
    Member

    TT to me means max effort. think of it less as a sprint and more as holding nothing back for 30 miles.

    #2847

    Ironmom
    Member

    "nwchick" wrote:
    I am going to do a 30 mile TT this weekend and am having trouble figuring out how to "sprint" that whole time.

    A "sprint" is by definition an extremely short distance, typically measured in a time of seconds, not minutes or hours. In the world of cycling, the sprint races are usually over in about 10 seconds.

    In a TT, the goal is to keep the highest possible speed that you can maintain over that distance. So your speed in a 30 mile TT will typically be slower than the speed you can maintain for a 15 mile TT, but faster than you can maintain for 60 miles. Learning what paces you can hold for various distances is all part of endurance training.

    Have you done any other time trials of different distances? If so, you can probably extrapolate an approximate pace for your 30 mile TT. One thing I find helpful in my training is to have a set of benchmark routes that I use. Over the course of a season (or several seasons) I can look at my times and average paces for various routes and that helps me plan workouts and estimate times for new routes or for races, based on similarity of terrain.

    One thing about cycliing is that both weather and terrain play a big role in your ability to hold a given pace. A flat course vs. rolling hills vs. big climbs will greatly change the pace that you can ride a given distance. Also, factors like wind can play a big role. 30 miles with a tailwind vs. 30 miles with a headwind vs. 30 miles with no wind may have a pace differential of 10mph or more! So predicting pace can be much more difficult in cycling than it is in running or swimming.

    Bottom line: for 30 miles, you’ll be riding at a pace that’s very close to your LT (lactate threshold). If you start feeling your muscles get fatigued, sluggish, or tingly, you’re probably crossing that threshold and may need to back the pace off a bit. Play with your pace relative to this threshold (and for some people, they prefer to also reference with a heart rate monitor and start tracking what heartrate their threshold is at) and see if you can find the zone that you’re comfortable in for that length of time. Of course, on the STP, you will not be cycling at anywhere near your LT!

    Luckily, the STP typically has a tailwind. :)

    #2848

    jonyoon
    Member

    "Ironmom" wrote: Bottom line: for 30 miles, you’ll be riding at a pace that’s very close to your LT (lactate threshold). If you start feeling your muscles get fatigued, sluggish, or tingly, you’re probably crossing that threshold and may need to back the pace off a bit. Play with your pace relative to this threshold (and for some people, they prefer to also reference with a heart rate monitor and start tracking what heartrate their threshold is at) and see if you can find the zone that you’re comfortable in for that length of time. Of course, on the STP, you will not be cycling at anywhere near your LT!

    Luckily, the STP typically has a tailwind. :)

    Spot on! Although the winds do shift in direction as the day progresses. Makes the second half of the 1 day or the afternoon/evening parts of the 2 day can get pretty daunting for some riders. Good thing that drafting is not only allowed, but strongly encouraged. :)

    #2849

    Ironmom
    Member

    "jonyoon" wrote:

    Spot on! Although the winds do shift in direction as the day progresses. Makes the second half of the 1 day or the afternoon/evening parts of the 2 day can get pretty daunting for some riders. Good thing that drafting is not only allowed, but strongly encouraged. :)

    YES, find a good pack and hang on for dear life! You can average WAY faster in the STP than you would in an individual event if you can get in with a nice little peloton…

    #2919

    nwchick
    Member

    Thanks everyone! I am going to do the flying wheels century this weekend to suss out how i am feeling/how my training is paying off. Apparently word on the street is that if you can do the 100miler then the stp in one day is doable….we shall see! Im going to try and embrace the hills and just get ‘er done!!!

    Sarah

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